5Q+1 visits with new Tennessean
That would be GetReligion reader Bob Smietana, of course, along with the rest of his family. You That would be GetReligion reader Bob Smietana, of course, along with the rest of his family.
Assessing the state of the Godbeat
I posted earlier this week on three veteran superstars of the Godbeat — Ann Rodgers, Bob Smietana and I posted earlier this week on three veteran superstars of the Godbeat — Ann Rodgers, Bob Smietana and Bob Smietana
A top-notch profile of Baptist ethicist, with a few caveats
I really liked Tennessean Godbeat pro Bob Smietana's profile last year of Richard Land, then the Bob Smietana I really liked Tennessean Godbeat pro Bob Smietana’s profile last year of Richard Land, then theÂ
Churches dumping Boy Scouts over gay policy ... or not?
Godbeat pro Bob Smietana wrote a story this week exploring whether churches will keep sponsoring Godbeat pro Bob Smietana wrote a story this week exploring whether churches will keep sponsoring Bob Smietana (@bobsmietana) May 31, 2013 So there you have it. Bottom line: It's a crazy world out
The Fairness Doctrine and religious broadcasters
story that begins with the F-word. The Tennessean religion reporter Bob Smietana began his story on the
Religion NIMBYs
The Tennessean published a pretty good article from Bob Smietana over the weekend that dealt with a
Who you calling a radical?
reporter Bob Smietana. And the finished product reflected that. reporter Bob Smietana. And the finished product reflected that. To be sure, the reporters do a great job
Pod people: Local vs. national press on religious liberty
Bob Smietana has the story: NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Americans have always had mixed feelings about
A story of biblical proportions: WPost tackles plans for $800 million Bible museum
Newswriters Association's annual meeting (see our 5Q+1 interview with RNA president Bob Smietana and Newswriters Association's annual meeting (see our 5Q+1 interview with RNA president Bob Smietana, if
Shameless plugs for Godbeat pros
accurate reporting -- Julia Duin (who won in multiple categories!), and Bob Smietana. Another award accurate reporting — Julia Duin (who won in multiple categories!), and Bob Smietana. Another award
'End-times cat cult': Why Bob Smietana's 'Apocalypse Meow' story really is the cat's meow
Wow. Wow. Wow. This Nashville Scene cover story by Bob Smietana really is the cat's meow. I mean 'End-times cat cult': Why Bob Smietana's 'Apocalypse Meow' story really is the cat's meow Bob Smietana
5Q+1 interview: Religion writer Bob Smietana on the Godbeat, #RNA2014 and, yes, GetReligion
annual conference. In advance of the national meeting of religion journalists, RNA President Bob 5Q+1 interview: Religion writer Bob Smietana on the Godbeat, #RNA2014 and, yes, GetReligion Smietana did a 5Q+1 interview (that's five questions plus a bonus question) with GetReligion. I'll sprinkle Bob Smietana
Part-time Godbeat: The Tennessean reports — briefly — on a local PCUSA vote on same-sex marriage
Since the departure of Bob Smietana in August 2013, The Tennessean — the major daily in Nashville Bob Smietana when a newspaper fails to devote adequate staffing and resources to the beat. We miss you, Bob Smietana.
After 'Spotlight' Oscar euphoria, the hangover: Worry about the future of religion journalism
If Bob Smietana is worried about the future of religion journalism in America, then we all should Bob Smietana If Bob Smietana is worried about the future of religion journalism in America, then we all should be. Just the other night, Smietana — immediate past president of the Religion Newswriters Association — joined his Godbeat colleagues in celebrating the best picture Oscar for "Spotlight": "Spotlight" is, of course, a "based on a true story" movie about Boston Globe journalists who won a 2003 Pulitzer Prize for their investigation into the Catholic clergy sex abuse scandal: But after celebrating Sunday night, Smietana has a must-read piece today on the Washington Post's Acts of Faith blog that asks this timely and important question: ‘Spotlight’ just won an Oscar. So why am I so worried about the future of religion journalism? Why indeed? Even before reading Smietana's op-ed, regular GetReligion readers probably have some inkling of his concerns: Smietana points out the key role that a religion writer — Michael Paulson — played on the Globe's Spotlight investigative team, even if Paulson wasn't depicted on the big screen. And Smietana laments that many news organizations have eliminated such specialists: Providing context is exactly what religion writers do. We know that both the “religion” part and the “news” part of religion news matter. Covering religion isn’t primarily writing feel good-features about the holidays for what used to be called the “church page,” or covering theological disputes like whether heaven or hell exists, or even writing about what pastor endorses which candidate. It’s bigger than that. Religion news is real news about people’s families, their souls, and the power of their faith — a power institutions can harness for good or ill. It’s the kind of news that needs both the power of investigative reporters and the knowledge of God-beat pros. But life on the religion beat is uncertain these days. While there are more people writing about religion, and enormous interest in the topic, there are fewer full-time pros on the beat, especially at newspapers. Many of those newspapers have dropped the religion beat or farmed it out to freelancers. Many religion writers cover a second beat at the same time. Meanwhile, the job of covering the God beat has become more difficult. Amen. Amen. Amen. (And I probably left out an appropriate "Amen" or two.) I'll resist the urge to copy and paste Smietana's entire piece. But trust me when I say: You really need to read it all. If Bob Smietana is worried about the future of religion journalism in America, then we all should be.
Congrats, media! Most Americans clueless about Planned Parenthood 'baby parts' videos
If you read GetReligion — and obviously you do if you're seeing this — you know pro-life advocates accused the media of dragging their feet on the Planned Parenthood "baby parts" videos. GetReligionista emeritus Mollie Hemingway was among the loudest voices making that claim: Of course, the videos made front-page news month last month when anti-abortion forces were indicted in Houston: Again, some saw a double standard: So why do I bring up the "baby parts" videos now? Because of a new national survey by LifeWay Research, the prominent evangelical research firm. Bottom line: Most Americans are clueless about the videos: • • • Here's the top of Godbeat veteran Bob Smietana's survey report for LifeWay: NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Over the past six months, a series of undercover videos focused on Planned Parenthood made national headlines, provoked outrage in Congress, and prompted investigations in about a dozen states. Still, the reaction of most Americans is, “What videos?” The videos show activists from the Center for Medical Progress (CMP) and Planned Parenthood officials discussing and negotiating possible payments for donated fetal remains. Leaders of the CMP say the videos show Planned Parenthood illegally selling fetal remains. Planned Parenthood denies that claim. A phone survey of 1,000 Americans from Nashville-based LifeWay Research found 7 out of 10 are either not aware of the videos (43 percent) or have not spoken out after seeing them (27 percent). Among those who are aware of the videos, relatively few spoke out against Planned Parenthood. “Given the serious accusations against Planned Parenthood — that they sold baby parts — it is surprising how few Americans responded,” said Ed Stetzer, executive director of LifeWay Research. The survey was completed in September, at a time the videos received renewed attention during a debate among Republican presidential candidates. Just yesterday, we were reminded of the media bias against pro-life advocates that infects so much news coverage: In a tweet, Smietana said the videos "gained little traction, despite the headlines." But were there enough headlines? Was adequate media attention paid to the accusations that Planned Parenthood sold baby parts? Does the LifeWay survey reflect ambivalence by Americans toward the "baby parts" videos? Or is the media to blame for failing to expose Planned Parenthood? More from LifeWay: The reaction to the videos may provide a lesson to pro-life groups, said Stetzer. While the videos seemed to connect with churchgoers, older and white Americans, and those in the Midwest and South, they missed younger Americans and those from diverse backgrounds. “Through social media it is easy to assume everyone in America is having the same conversation,” Stetzer said. “But these results show that is not the case." Interesting analysis, as always, from Stetzer. So far, I haven't seen any mainstream media reports of the LifeWay survey. Of course, the findings were released just today. If you see any coverage, by all means, please provide links. In the meantime, what do you make of the lack of awareness of the videos? I asked Stetzer this question are clueless about the videos. Here's the top of Godbeat veteran Bob Smietana's survey report for LifeWay: Bob Smietana
Friday Five: Southern Baptists and Catholic bishops and White House Bible verses, oh my! What a week!
Bob Smietana religion writer's dream," said Bob Smietana, veteran Godbeat pro. "When 'Bible' is trending in one
Friday Five: Top religion journalists, Christian rock, rainbow-cross flag burning, Sarah Sanders doctrine
: Peter Smith, Peggy Fletcher Stack, Tim Funk, Sarah Pulliam Bailey, Emma Green, Elizabeth Dias, Bob Smietana, Jeremy Weber and Ted Olsen. Congratulations to all of those honored for their work on the
Friday Five: New editor for RNS, Sutherland Springs gunman's wife, Pennsylvania grand jury and more
editor in chief. The name will be familiar to regular GetReligion readers: Bob Smietana. Smietana, as a position, we were impressed by the breadth and depth of Bob Smietana’s religion journalism experience, his Bob Smietana years," someone named Bob Smietana (you might have heard of him) wrote on Facebook. 2. Most popular
There are must-read stories, and then there's this incredible story on 'The search for Jackie Wallace'
I've seen in years," veteran religion writer Bob Smietana said in his own tweet. "There are stories Bob Smietana
In real-life Mayberry, what makes Trump supporters tick: Religion? Race? Economics?
veteran Bob Smietana's suggestion that "this is the big religion story for 2017," here's what I'd
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