Freedom to drink the tea

hallucinogenic teaHow significant was Tuesday's unanimous Supreme Court ruling -- allowing a New Mexico congregation to use a hallucinogenic tea in its religious rituals -- in establishing precedent in religious-freedom law? If you read Wednesday's Washington Post article, you would come away thinking the impact was minimal, but thankfully, the Internet gives us other sources of information. (GetReligion's original post on the issue is here.) Linda Greenhouse of The New York Times grasps the significance in the second paragraph of her report on the ruling:

With an opinion by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., the decision was one of the most significant applications of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, a 13-year-old federal statute that requires the government to meet a demanding test before it can enforce a law in a way that creates a substantial obstacle to religious observance.

That's about it, though. The rest of the article, along with the Post article, focuses mostly on how the issue came before the Supreme Court and on Chief Justice John Roberts' writing style (it's refreshingly conversational and lacking in numerous footnotes, by the way).

The Los Angeles Times places the "victory for religious freedom" theme front and center and quotes K. Hollyn Hollman, the Baptist Joint Committee's general counsel, who said the decision was "good news for religious freedom and the continuing vitality of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act."

For more background on the ruling's significance, turn to this Christianity Today article published this morning, which quotes several legal types in religious-freedom organizations. (Disclosure: a coauthor of this piece, Sarah Pulliam, is indeed my younger sister.)

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