Osama's school days

BinLadenIn the Dec. 12 issue of The New Yorker, Steve Coll shows how it's possible to write about the student years of Osama bin Laden without larding up one's manuscript with cheap-shot adjectives. After all, when a reporter has uncovered enough troubling details, it's best to let the details speak for themselves. Here's what Coll turned up about a soccer and study club that met at the Al Thagher Model School in Jedda, which bin Laden graduated from in 1976:

The after-school study sessions took place in the Syrian gym teacher's room, on the second floor. The teacher would light a candle on a table in the middle of the room, and the boys, including bin Laden, would sit on the floor and listen. The stories that the Syrian told were ambiguous as to time and place, the schoolmate recalled, and they were not explicitly set in the time of the Prophet, as are traditional hadiths. "It was mesmerizing," he said, and increasingly the Syrian teacher told them "stories that were really violent. I can't remember all of them now, except for one."

It was a story "about a boy who found God -- exactly like us, our age. He wanted to please God and he found that his father was standing in his way. The father was pulling the rug out from under him when he went to pray." The Syrian "told the story slowly, but he was referring to 'this brave boy' or 'this righteous boy' as he moved toward the story's climax. He explained that the father had a gun. He went through twenty minutes of the boy's preparation, step by step -- the bullets, loading the gun, making a plan. Finally, the boy shot the father." As he recounted this climax, the Syrian declared, "Lord be praised -- Islam was released in that home." As the schoolmate recounted it, "I watched the other boys, fourteen-year-old boys, their mouths open. By the grace of God, I said 'No' to myself. . . . I had a feeling of anxiety. I began immediately to think of excuses and how I could avoid coming back."

Coll also offers this explanation of the uses (or misuses) of the word Wahhabism:

The kingdom's dominant school of Islam is often called Wahhabism by non-Saudis, in reference to Muhammad bin Abdul Wahhab, an eighteenth-century desert preacher who allied himself with the al Saud family when it first established political control over the Arabian Peninsula, and whose descendants are still among Saudi Arabia's most important official clergy. Many Saudis reject the term "Wahhabism" as pejorative; they regard Wahhab's ideas as Islam itself, properly interpreted, and they argue that no other label is required. Some Saudis acknowledge their country's dominant theology as a distinct school of Islamic thought, but they will typically refer to this school as Salafism, a term that refers to the beliefs and practices of the earliest followers of Islam. With some exceptions, adherents of the Salafi school steer away from purposeful political organizing; instead, they often emphasize matters of personal faith, such as the strict regulation of Islamic rituals, and of an individual's private conduct and prayer.

Finally, there is this wry level of detail about the career path of Osama's son:

Abdullah bin Laden, Osama's son, today lives in Jedda and enjoys good health, according to several people who know him. (He did not respond to requests for an interview.) In a story published in a London-based Saudi-owned newspaper in 2001, Abdullah said that he left his father's household in the mid-nineties, when Osama was preparing to leave Sudan, where he had been living in exile, for a new and uncertain exile in Afghanistan. Not wishing to endure such hardship any longer, Abdullah sought and received his father's permission to return to Saudi Arabia, where he has since taken up a career in advertising and public relations.

Abdullah runs his own firm, called Fame Advertising, which has offices near a Starbucks in a two-story strip mall on Palestine Street, one of Jedda's busiest commercial thoroughfares. "Fame . . . Is Your Fame" is the company's slogan, according to its marketing brochures. Among the firm's advertised specialties is "event management," which refers to the staging of attention-grabbing corporate galas and launch parties for new products or stores. The firm makes this promise: "Fame Advertising events are novel, planned meticulously, and executed with efficiency." On the back of this brochure is printed a single word: "Different."

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